Report shows many youths do not wear helmets

Report shows many youths do not wear helmets

Sixty-one percent, 58% and 18% of parents reported that their children ages 4 to 13 never wore helmets while riding scooters, skateboarding and biking, respectively, with helmet use less likely among older youths, according to the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health. Parents should make sure their children wear helmets and practice safety in the streets, Dr. Gary Freed said.
HealthDay News (5/20), Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (5/20)

Excessive consumption of sugary beverages may shorten life, research suggests

Excessive consumption of sugary beverages may shorten life, research suggests

CNN (5/17, Scutti) reports that “a study links drinking too many sugary beverages – and even 100% natural fruit juices – to an increased risk of early death.” The study, which was published on Friday in JAMA Network Open, found that “drinking an excessive amount of fruit juice could lead to an increased risk of premature death ranging from 9% to 42%,” according to CNN.

TV watching adversely affects sleep in young children

TV watching adversely affects sleep in young children

Preschoolers with more than an hour of daily TV exposure had 22 minutes less nightly sleep compared with those who watched TV for less than an hour daily, researchers reported in the journal Sleep Health. The findings, based on data involving 470 children ages 3 to 5, also showed that those with TVs in the bedroom had 30 minutes less nightly sleep on average and 17 minutes shorter total 24-hour sleep on average, despite having 12 minute longer nap times, compared with those who didn’t have TVs in the bedroom.
Psych Central (5/16)

Lower-fat diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and grains may lower risk of death from breast cancer

Lower-fat diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and grains may lower risk of death from breast cancer

The Washington Post (5/15, McGinley) reports that in “the latest analysis of the federally funded Women’s Health Initiative,” researchers found that “women who followed a lower-fat diet rich in fruits, vegetables and grains had a lower risk of dying from breast cancer than those on a higher-fat diet.” The findings are scheduled to be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual meeting.

UV light in tanning beds may trigger genetic mutations that can lead to skin malignancies

UV light in tanning beds may trigger genetic mutations that can lead to skin malignancies

Reuters (4/29, Rapaport) reports that “indoor tanning is associated with a higher risk of developing…melanoma at younger ages, and” research “suggests the ultraviolet (UV) light in tanning beds may be triggering genetic mutations that can lead to skin malignancies.” After looked at “data on 114 melanoma patients who had a history of indoor tanning and 222 melanoma patients who did not,” investigators “estimated that melanoma developed about a decade earlier when patients had a history of indoor tanning.” Meanwhile, “genetic mutations linked to melanoma were also more common among indoor tanners, occurring in 43 percent of patients in this group compared with 28 percent of cases in people without a history of indoor tanning.” The findings were published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.